Is Religion the Foundation of Justice and Law?

Atheists in America complain that having the Ten Commandments as the foundation of American law is an imposition of religion upon them. However, religion, justice and law are inseparably linked, because justice and law are always based on religion. The logic connecting these concepts is found in the dictionary definitions of each and the understanding of how societies form around common ideas.

Religion is a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe. Everyone in the world has a belief about the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe and acts upon these beliefs every waking moment of their lives, because their beliefs are translated into decisions that direct their actions. Religion is also described as a person’s worldview, because a worldview is a person’s belief on the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe.

Worldviews, which are the common bond among families, are rendered into principles that regulate conduct. When families join together to form communities, their common beliefs also regulate their relationship to one another. Ultimately, communities join together to form countries with the same fundamental principles based on a common worldview. These common beliefs, standards of conduct, and principles are the foundation of a country’s law.

Foundational law determines how societies operate, how they are organized, and how they interact with other nations. Foundational law is not written legislation by a government, it is what people in a society or their civil administrators use to justify laws they accept, pass, or decree and it is their measuring stick for justice.

Justice is a moral judgment derived from principles, which comes from a worldview. When people in society or their civil administrators make moral judgments they are basing them on their worldview. For example, from a Christian worldview the treatment of women in Islamic nations, the plight of the poor in Hindu nations, and the confiscation of property in Atheistic nations is unjust, yet each one of these nations uphold their practices as lawful within their worldview and to criticize them is to criticize their religion. In this way law and religion are inseparably linked.

Law, by definition, is derived from principles; principles are derived from beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, which is religion. Therefore, law is derived from religion and cannot be separated from it.

The question is not, “If religion should be the foundation of law?” it is, “What religion is the foundation of law?” For example, Atheists may claim not to have any religion, but their belief is their religion and Atheism has been codified into law in every communist or socialist nation in the world. As America drifts further and further from its Christian roots, more and more Atheistic beliefs have invaded our nation and this is why we have instituted each one of the Ten Planks of Communism into our society in one form or another.

Overwhelming original source documentation supports the fact the United States is a nation founded on a Christian worldview supported by biblical law. People who are unwilling to live under Christian based laws should first go live in the nation that has completely codified their beliefs into law and determine for themselves if that system of governance is better for them before they attempt to destroy the precious gift our founders gave to us.

It is true America has not been without reproach in its conduct throughout its history, but this is in spite of Christianity and not because of it. No person or nation can uphold God’s perfect Law perfectly, but nations that aspire to do so are blessed by God, as America has been blessed, and nations that do not aspire to uphold God’s Law are ultimately destroyed by God, as history attests.

One does not need to be a follower of Christ to see the equity in the Ten Commandments or the liberty that it provides, and one does not need to travel very far to see the injustice in every other system of government in the world. Regardless of one’s religious belief, if they live in America they should respect its Christian based laws, because it is the only religion that gives them the freedom to believe what they want to believe and restrains behavior that undermines societies.

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2 thoughts on “Is Religion the Foundation of Justice and Law?

  1. A friend of mine once opined, “it’s all about who can kick who’s ass!” Foundational law is determined and maintained by the sword. In America the people once wielded the sword and hence determined foundational law based on Christian values. Communism was brought to prosperous Russia through force during the Revolutions by a few armed evil radicals while the majority of society did not agree with their values.

    One may argue that people who lose their values are ripe for slavery but I don’t believe it takes much more than a small percentage of armed radicals to flip a society’s foundation of law. I think some of our Army special forces troops can attest to this belief. I does not take many armored humvees or MRAP’s to accomplish this in California, Connecticut or the Carolinas. Conversely it does not take many Apaches or M-4’s with Godly men behind them to restore Christian values and retain or restore America’s original foundation of law.

    Ultimately the sword is what determines the foundation of law and not the notion of values.

  2. D Lively says:

    The statement “because justice and law are always based on religion” in my opinion is a simplification. Moral principles are not necessarily the product of religion.

    I would agree with “Overwhelming original source documentation supports the fact the United States is a nation founded on a Christian worldview supported by biblical law” but the author tends to over state the connection between “Religion” and justice and law.

    American Founding Principles says:

    It appears as if D Lively has taken the definition of ‘religion’ out of context and is using a different definition then used in Is Religion the Foundation of Justice and Law? Religion in this context does not specifically mean Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, or any other organized religion; it is only referring to a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe. For example, evolutionism is a religion in this context and the religions listed above could be used to describe a person’s worldview, but this definition of religion is not limited to those listed.

    As I explained in the post, moral judgments are derived from principles and principles are derived from a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, which is religion. I would agree with D Lively’s statement if he is using a different definition of religion, but if he is using the one from the post then he is incorrect, because moral principles come from what a person believes, which is their worldview also known as their religion.

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